Seven Layer Bars

Processed with VSCO
Seven Layer Bars

Seven layer bars are my favorite dessert to bring to a party. They disappear before you know it. Why? Because these bars include the very best ingredients used in baking.

Seven layer bars are also known as “sin bars,” after the seven deadly sins. While I firmly believe this treat is a blessing, I can see how each ingredient matches up with one of the sins.

  1. Butter (gluttony): Butter. Butter, butter, butter. Keep repeating the word to yourself. Say no more.
  2. Graham crackers (envy): They are the foundation of a s’more, the crust for cheesecakes. Who wouldn’t envy the graham cracker?
  3. Butterscotch (lust): The most beautiful, mysterious flavor. I find butterscotch difficult to describe fully.
  4. Chocolate (greed): My love, my vice, my everything. I cannot get enough of chocolate.
  5. Coconut (pride):  It’s everywhere, in all forms. Why wouldn’t coconut be proud?
  6. Walnuts (anger): Have you ever seen a whole walnut? I hope so. It’s elegant, buttery, and craggy. It looks angry.
  7. Sweetened condensed milk (sloth): The very nature of this ingredient is sloth-like. It’s so slow to come out of the can, you have to use a spatula to get it out. Perfect match.
Processed with VSCO
Let’s get a close up shot, shall we?

Seven Layer Bars

  • 1 stick of butter
  • 1 cup graham cracker crumbs
  • 1 cup shredded coconut
  • 6 oz chocolate chips
  • 6 oz butterscotch chips
  • 1 cup chopped walnuts
  • 1 can sweetened condensed milk
  1. Melt the butter.
  2. Mix the graham cracker crumbs with the butter until fully combined. Place mixture into a 13 x 9 baking dish. Press the graham cracker mixture down until it forms a crust covering the bottom of the pan.
  3. Layer the coconut, chocolate chips, butterscotch chips, and chopped walnuts on top of the graham cracker crust.
  4. Pour the sweetened condensed milk over these layers to cover the entire pan.
  5. Bake at 350 degrees for about 25-30 minutes, or until the edges are golden brown.
  6. Make sure to let the bars cool before you cut into them!

 

Braised Brussels Sprouts with Bacon and Cotija Cheese

Braised Brussels Sprouts with Bacon and Cotija Cheese

Today I’m offering a two-part reflection. One on the beauty of cast iron skillets, and another on the deliciousness that is the brussels sprout.


We Should All Be Like Cast Iron Skillets (a poem)

We should all be like cast iron skillets—

A vessel that can take the heat.

Built of strength, it can endure most anything.

With time, it becomes more nonstick,

seasoned, retaining the wisdom of what’s touched its surface before,

letting things go cleanly, more easily.

We should all be like cast iron skillets—

a vessel through which masterpieces are made.

Reliable, it will always be there,

a labor of love lasting a lifetime.


As I grew up, brussels sprouts had a bad reputation. The cliché going around was that one may like vegetables, except for brussels sprouts.

A typical conversation among friends or family members:

Inquiring adult: “Kristina, do you eat your vegetables?”

Kristina (as a child): “Yes, I eat my vegetables!”

Adult: “Which vegetables do you like to eat?”

Kristina: “Well, I like corn, potatoes, tomatoes, green beans, broccoli, all kinds. But I hate brussels sprouts. Gross!”

Here’s the thing—I had never even tried brussels sprouts. I heard such terrible things about this vegetable that I didn’t have the guts to try it until I was maybe 23 years old.

I know. Shameful.

When I did finally try them at a restaurant in Boston, I was floored with how delicious this vegetable really is. Brussels sprouts have a more earthy, cabbage-like flavor that pairs so incredibly well with bacon and cheese. The sprouts caramelize, boasting a hint of sweetness that begs for crispy bacon and salty, yet firm cheese. This is why we see many recipes for brussels sprouts with parmesan, for example. I chose cotija cheese for its mild yet salty qualities. The cheese melts just enough, and then it browns right along with the sprouts at the very end.

This dish is one of my kitchen experiments, and after a few tries, I’ve hit the jackpot of deliciousness. I love serving this as a side dish with baked chicken or on top of pasta. Enjoy, and let me know if you make it!

Braised Brussels Sprouts with Bacon and Cotija Cheese

  • 1 lb. brussels sprouts, cut into halves or quarters depending on the sprout’s size
  • 3-4 slices applewood smoked bacon
  • 1/3 cup chicken stock
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed in a garlic press
  • 1/4 cup crumbled cotija cheese
  • salt and pepper to taste
  1. Slice bacon into pieces about 1/2 inch wide and place into a cast iron skillet. Turn on the heat to medium-high and fry until crispy. Take the crispy bacon pieces out of the pan with a slotted spoon and place bacon into a dish. Set aside.
  2. While the bacon is cooking, prepare your brussels sprouts. Slice off the very bottom of the sprout and throw away. Cut the brussels sprout in half. If the sprout is quite large, you can cut the sprout in half again.
  3. Once the bacon is done cooking, place the brussels sprouts in the cast iron skillet with the bacon fat. Over medium heat, let the sprouts acquire an initial char (about 2 minutes).
  4. Place minced garlic in the pan and stir to incorporate. Add crushed black pepper to taste (I used about 1/4 teaspoon, you can always add more).
  5. Pour 1/3 cup chicken stock into the pan and cover the skillet with a lid. Let the sprouts steam over medium heat for about 5-7 minutes. The liquid should be about evaporated.
  6. Turn up the heat to medium high and let the sprouts caramelize further as the liquid fully evaporates, 1-2 minutes.
  7. Add crispy bacon and crumbled cotija cheese into the pan. Turn off the heat, and allow the cheese to melt just slightly.